sábado, 22 de enero de 2011

HOBSBAWM, Eric, THE AGE OF EMPIRE, Chapter 4, THE POLITIC OF DEMOCRACY, Vintage Book, A DIVISION OF RANDOM HOUSE, INC. NEW YORK

(...) "An international outburst of hysteria among the rulers of Europe and among its terrified middle clases, provoked by the short-lived Commune of Paris in 1871, whose suppression had been followed by massaccres of Parisians on a scale which would normally have been inconceivable in civilized nineteenth-century states.  Even by our more barbarous standards, the scale is still impressive. This brief, brutal -and for the time uncharacteristic. unleashing of blind terror by respectable society reflected a fundamntal problem of the politics of bourgeois society: that of its democratizacion" (...)

(...) "Democracy, as the sagacious Aristotle had observed, was the goverment of the mass of the people, who were, on the whole, poor. The interest of th poor and the rich, the privileged and de unprivileged, are evidently not the same; even if wie assume that they are or can be, the masses are rather unlikely to consider public affairs in the same light and in the same terms as what British Victorian writers called "the classes", happily sitll able to identify class plitical action only with aristocracy and bourgeoisi. This was the basic dilemma of nineteenth-century liberalism. , devoted as it was to constitutions and sovereign elected assemblies, which it did iits  best to sidestep by beeing non-democratic, i.e. by excludin the majority of male citizens of states, non to mention the totality of their female inhabitants, from the raight to vote an to be elected."(...)

(...) "What indeed, would happen in politics when the masses of the people, ignorant and brutalized, unable to understand the elegant an slautary logic of Adam Smith's free market, controlled the poitical fate of states?" (...)

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